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Note: This website contains only DRAFT material generated by the technology planning committee. The content has not been presented to - or approved by - the board of education. The site does not include built in spell check or grammar check, and many typographical errors remain on these pages. This will be rectified in the first draft of the complete document. Please accept our invitation to view (and offer feedback on) this work in progress.



Infrastructure, Hardware, Software, and Technical Support


This section of the wiki is provided for discussion and collaboration related to the Infrastructure component of the technology plan. Please share your thoughts below by clicking on Edit This Page above.

Subcommittee Lead: Will Carr
Subcommittee Members: Fernando Cabeje, Janeth McDaniel

Guiding Questions (May appear as an appendix.)

a. Describe the technology hardware, electronic learning resources, networking and telecommunications infrastructure, physical plant modifications, and technical support needed by the district’s teachers, students, and administrators to support the activities in the Curriculum and Professional Development Components of the plan.

Hardware:

Existing District hardware will be sufficient to meet many of the goals in the curriculum and professional development sections of the plan. (See section 5b below for additional detail on existing hardware.) However, there are still significant hardware requirements that need to be met over the next three years. Not the least of these requirements is the need to provide sufficient computers to meet curriculum objectives 3f1.1 through 3f.1.4, which call for improving the student to computer ratio for all students - including those in ELL, GATE, and special education programs - from 7-to-1 to 5-to-1 over the course of three years. Figure 5.1 below depicts the number of computers needed each year (2007-2010) to replace aging computers, account for the estimated growth in the student population, and still reduce the student to computer ratio. Figure 5.2 depicts the projected costs of these machines. This need is addressed by objective 5c.2.2 below and by section 6b.

Figure 5.1. Student-to-Computer Ratio Needs:
Figure 5.2. Student-to-Computer Ratio Costs:
Spreadsheet:

In addition to lowering the student to computer ration overall, the hardware requirements necessary for the 1-to-1 pilot programs addressed in curriculum objective 3f.1.6 must also be provided. Figure 5.3 below depicts the number of computers needed each year (2007-2010) to make the curriculum benchmarks a reality. Figure 5.4 depicts the projected costs of these machnes. This need is addressed by objective 5c.2.5 below and by section 6b.

Figure 5.3. One-to-One Computer Needs:
Figure 5.4. One-to-One Computer Costs:
Spreadsheet:

Note that the acqusition of computers for the one-to-one pilot programs will be lowering the District student-to-computer ratio, and so the costs depicted in Figure 5.4 are not necessarily "in addition to" the costs depicted in Figure 5.2.

It is understood that these costs are significant and that they must be balanced among other district priorities, including construction of new schools. This plan identifies projected needs and associated costs. The allocation of these funds may remain a continuing challenge for the District.

Electronic Learning Resources:

Existing District Electronic Learning Resources (ELRs) will be sufficient to meet many of the goals in the curriculum and professional development sections of the plan. (See section 5b below for additional detail on existing ELRs.) However, in order to support curriculm goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 though 4b.9, purchase requests for new software, recurring subscriptions, and upgrades or maintenance contracts will need to be filled as necessary and as funding allows. It is anticipated that new ELRs, including educational video games and simulations, may be required to meet goals 3.b.2 and 4.b.2, which relate to student aquisition of 21st Century Skills, as identified in enGauge: 21st Century Skills for 21st Century Learners. This continued need for ELRs is addressed by goal 5c.1 below.

Networking and Telecommunications Infrastructure:

Existing District Networking and Telecommunications Infrastructure will be sufficient to meet many of the goals in the curriculum and professional development sections of the plan. (See section 5b below for additional detail on existing Networking and Telecommunications Infrastructure.) However, with the increased access to and creation of multi-media online resources by students and teaches - and with the increased use of technologies such as video streaming and video conferencing, bandwidth needs are expected to increase over the duration of this plan. Plans are already in place - and funding is already allocated - to provide every site with a minimum 200Gb link to the hub zone. Each hub will then have dual 200 Mb links to the district office. These will be upgraded to dual 1 Gb links by the end of the 2007-2008 school year. At each site, the current bandwidth is 100 Mb schoolwide. All switches are layer three switches, standardized on Cisco, including wireless access points. However, due to increased needs in the computer labs and multimedia rooms, the TIS department plans to introduce 1 Gb speeds to these locations during the next three years. This need for additional bandwidth is addressed in Objective 5c.3.2 below.

Wireless access presents the greatest anticipated need in networking infrstucture. At present, only the EETT funded middle schools and one elementary school (Edward Wenzlaff) provide wireless access in all instructional areas. With the increasing use of wireless computing devices in the District, this need is expected to increase dramatically in the next three years, particularly at one-to-one pilot program sites. High Schools will be given priority for new wireless access points, followed by elementary schools. By 2009-2010, wireless access should be available in all instructional areas districtwide. At the same time, as one-to-one pilot sites are implemented, these classrooms will require a 10:1 computer-to-accesspoint ratio in order to provide reliable and fast access for students and teachers in the pilot program. This need for additional wireless access is addressed in Objective 5c.3.3 below.

If wireless access is required at a one-to-one capacity on a sitewide basis, the TIS department anticipates that each middle school will require 12 to 18 additional Cisco 1200 access points. The high schools currently have some "hot spots" sufficient to handle about 15 laptops. Complete wireless coverage for a high school would require approximately 42 Cisco 1200's, or for the level of coverage needed for a one-to-one initiative, 84 Cisco 1200's. Edward Wenzlaff elementary school would require about 13 Cisco 1200's for one-to-one level coverage. All other elementary schools would require about 15 Ciscos 1200's for complete coverage, or 30 Cisco 1200's to provide coverage for a one-to-one solution. Some sites currently have access in the staff lounge, and the demand for this is expected to increase as well.

Physical Plant Modifications:

In most cases, the physical plant is sufficient to support the curriculum and professional development sections of the plan.

There is currently sufficient electrical capacity in the necessary parts of the schools. There are also sufficient outlets in the classrooms and libraries to supoport the hardware and infrastructure planned for each site. When new computer labs, or mobile labs, are added, additional capacity may be required, but the existing electrical panels are easily upgraded if needed.

In addition, storage rooms and classsrooms in which infrastructure, hardware, and electronic resources reside are secure. Additional alarm systems (or perhaps camera systems) may be necessary as additional resources are acquired.

Cabling specifications have been established by the TIS department. (See appendix X for details). All hardware and ancillary wiring is configured in a way that is safe for students to move about without creating a fire hazard. All cabling is in place in accordance with fire and safety codes. This is reviewed by the Planning department as well as Maintainance and Operations. The fire marshal is consulted and random inspections are held to ensure continuing compliance.

There is safe and secure access to labs that are used duing non-school hours by students and/or the community. School buildings, property, and users are safe and protected. Background checks, fingerprint checks, and reference checks are used to screen all contractors.

The TIS department anticpates two additionl needs related to physical plant. First, a new cooling system is reuired for the District Office Hub (DO-HUB) server room. Second, where interactive white boards (such as SMART boards or Active Boards) and projectors are required in classrooms, these will need to be properly and safely mounted.

The continued need for physical plant modifications is addressed in goal 5c.4 below.

Technical Support:

Existing District Technical Support will be sufficient to meet many of the goals in the curriculum and professional development sections of the plan. (See section 5b below for additional detail on existing Technical Support.) However, these resources are increasingly stretched thin, and technical support needs will only increase over the next three years, particularly given the need to support significantly more computers (due to the lower student-to-computer ratios and the one-to-one pilot program). The TIS department projects a need to reduce their technician to computer ratio from 1000:1 to a more reasonable 500:1 in order to sufficiently support curriculm goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 though 4b.9. Because this same period will see the student-to-computer ratio decrease (thus increasing the number of computers), and the student body is expected to grow by 2% per year (thus increasing the number of computers), the number of technicians needed will increase dramatically, from the current level of 5 technicians to a projected need of 14 technicians by 2009-2010. Figure 5.5 depicts this need. Figure 5.6 depicts the anticipated cost.

Figure 5.5 Technician Needs:
Figure 5.6 Technician Costs:
Spreadsheet:

This need for increased technical support is addressed in goal 5C.5 below.

Though it is not strictly necessary, and though there would be those who had to give up an old system to learn a new one, both teachers and technical support staff have expressed a desire to see the District standardize on specific curricular software titles. This standardization would allow the creation of training manuals and online FAQs. In addition, technical staff could then be trained to support specific titles.

In addition, the district would benefit from a program that allows students to provide technical support. Such a plan would need to include significant technical and customer service training for the students, possibly including certifications such as the MCSE, A+, MCP, or N+. This might appear as part of a school-to-career technical education program.

Safe and Secure Computing Environment:

The District currently provides a safe and secure computing environment sufficient to meet many of the goals in the curriculum and professional development sections of the plan. (See section 5b below for additional detail on the existing safe and secure computing environment.) However, purchase requests for new hardware, software, recurring subscriptions, and upgrades or maintenance contracts will need to be filled as necessary and as funding allows. In addition, it is recognized that providing internet filtering via home internet access for one-to-one pilot program students may become a necessity. Also one-to-one laptops may require anti-theft hardware or software, and encryption may be necessary for sensitive data. These safety and security needs are addressed by goal 5c.6 below.

Policies and Procedures:

The district currently provides an Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) for employees and a variety of AUPs for students, depending upon grade level and subject area. (See appendix X for details.) However, these AUPs are largely out of date and do not address current technologies or trends. In addition, student email use is currently not allowed, except through a labor-intensive teacher-moderated system at Gaggle.net. Teachers have expressed a need for students to be able to use third-party email providers (or a district provided email address) on the school network, particularly if students are expected to become technically proficient and acquire 21st Century Skills. Also, there is currently no written policy for students or staff regarding the use of instant messaging, video conferencing, and two-way web technologies such as blogs, wikis, and podcasts. This need for updated and additional policies and procedures is addressed in goal 5c.7 below.

b. Describe the existing hardware, Internet access, electronic learning resources, and technical support already in the district that could be used to support the Curriculum and Professional Development Components of the plan.

Hardware:

The following hardware profile for the district is based on the 2006 California School Technology Survey. See appendix X for a detailed graphical representation of this data.

The current student-to-computer ratio is 5.88 to 1. (The ratio of students per internet connected computer is approximately 6.49 to 1). Of these machines, 14.53% are less than year old, 12.53% are 1 to 2 years old, 10.69% are 2 to 3 years old, 16.89% are 3 to 4 years old, and unfortunately, 45.35% are more than four years old. Despite the clear need for replacement computers, only 3.67% were projected to be retired in the 2006-2007 school year, with only 6.65% expected to be added. Though this is a net gain of 2.98%, the number of computers more than four years old is expected to increase.

These computers are located primarily in classrooms (66.22%). An additional 27.33% are located in computer labs, with 5.66% in libraries, and only .78% located elsewhere on campus.

Almost all computers are currently connected to the Internet (98.6%). In addition, 90.58% of all classrooms are connected to the Internet. Both of these numbers are expected to increase this year.

Internet Access:

The District current provides a Wide Area Network (WAN) and Local Area Networks (LANs) in a star topology with redundant links for failover. The current design is appropriate for the local environment and is at the top of the industry standards for reliability and speed.

Existing WAN Infrastructure

The District Office Hub (DO-HUB) has a 45 Mb connection to the Riverside County Office of Education (RCOE), which serves as the ISP for the district.

The DO-HUB is currently connected to the Cathedral City Hub (CC-HUB) and the Palm Springs Hub (PS-HUB) via dual 200 Mb microwave radios. Dual 200 Mb radios are also in place Between the PS-HUB and the Landau Tower. The Desert Hotsprings Hub (DH-HUB) connects to the PS-HUB through a 100 Mb Radio. During the 2007-2008 school year the District will upgrade each of these links to a 1 Gb capacity. This upgrade is already funded and much of the equipment has already been purchased. The 100 Mb connection between the DH-HUB and the PS-HUB will be upgraded before the end of the 2006-2007 school year.

Each school school site connects to the nearest Hub via a single 200 Mb radio. All of these school site links will be upgraded to 1 Gb links over the next two years as well. Again, this has already been budgeted. In addition to the primary link, each school has a back-up link. Though the older T-1 links are currently turned off, the hardware is also still in place in case of an emergency.

The exiting WAN infrastructure is illustrated in Figure 5.7.

Figure 5.7: Graphic of WAN

Existing LAN Infrastructure

Each school site has a fiber backbone from the Main Distribution Facility (MDF) to all Internal Distribution Facilities (IDFs), which are then connected to each instructional or administrative area via 100 Mb ethernet. Cisco access points currently provide wireless internet access, (including VLAN security and mac address filtering) to a limited number of instructional and administrative areas. As part of the EETT competative grants, all four middle schools currently have schoolwide wireless coverage. One elementary school, Edward Wenzlaff, has school wide coverage as well.

With two exceptions, the Technology and Information Services department (TIS) projects that this level of internet access will be sufficient to meet the district's bandwidth needs through the duration of this plan (July 2007 to June 2010). The first exception is the obvious bottleneck - the 45 Mb connetion to the RCOE. Unfortunately, at this time the RCOE cannot accommotade additional bandwidth. Through the judicious use of caching and traffic filtering the District maximizes this available bandwidth. The second exception is the anticipated need for increased wireless access.

Electronic Learning Resources:

Hub sites (and additional sites depending on need) have curriculum software servers that host many titles used at multiple sites. Additional resources are installed on individual machines or stored at individual sites. The following is a representative list of Electronic Learning Resources in use throughout the District:

  • Accelerated Math
  • Accelerated Reader
  • Adobe Creative Suite
  • Adobe GoLive
  • Adobe Premier
  • Apperture
  • Apple Works
  • Atomic Learning
  • Autocad
  • Brainpop
  • Central Skills
  • CHSEE Software Suite (Title?)
  • Dreamweaver
  • Destiny (including home access)
  • MPower
  • Final Cut
  • Foreign Language Software (specific titles?)
  • iLife
  • Inspiration
  • Inspiration Data
  • InterWrite Pad Software
  • Kidbiz3000
  • Kidspiration
  • KidPix
  • Learn to Read
  • Math Blaster
  • Mavis Beacon
  • Microsoft Office
  • Orchard
  • Open Court Online (including home access)
  • Premier
  • Qwizdom Suite
  • Read180
  • Reading Blaster
  • Scholastic Reading Counts
  • Scholastic Reading Inventory
  • School Kit
  • STAR Reading
  • STAR Math
  • Technology Literacy Challenge Software
  • Type to Learn Jr.
  • Ultra Key
  • Understanding Math Plus
  • Understanding Numeration Plus
  • United Streaming
  • Various Supplementary Software Included with Approved Textbooks
  • Waterford Early Reading Program
  • Zangle (including home access)

Addition electronic learning resources are in use in individual classrooms. This list represents programs that are common in the district.

Technical Support:

Technical support needs are addressed to ensure that the hardware, LANs, WANs, and peripherals function adequately and that problems are addressed in an acceptable response time. Various network monitoring tools are used to identify and respond to network problems. In addition, a helpdesk system that tracks and escalates calls is in use. According to helpdesk records, 70 percent of all calls to the helpdesk are resolved during the call. Work order requests are then normally resolved within two working days.

The help desk technician was recently made a full time position, and this person resolves as many issues as possible over the phone. Five full-time technicians then respond to work orders as necessary. An additional three technicians and the network manager provide support for the network backbone infrastructure. In addition, four other staff members in the TIS department provides end-user software support for enterprise services such as email and the student information system, Zangle. Other departments or specialists within Educational Services provide most curriculum related software support. The certificated Educational Technology Specialist provides significant and ongoing support for teachers, particularly those involved with the EETT competative grants.

According to the 2006 California School Technology Survey, the average hardware fix time is two to five days, and the current techical support staffing is at .13 FTW's per 1000 students in both certificated and classified support. In addition, curriculum support staffing is at .23 FTE's for certificated support and .16 for classified support. (See appendix X for a detailed graphical representation of this data.)

Safe and Secure Computing Environment:

The District provides a safe and secure computing environment for staff and students. Tools used to accomplish this purpose include firewalls, intrusion detection, anti-virus, audit systems and encryption for sensative data. The District also incorpoarates VLANs with mac-address access lists to segment the student and administrative networks in order to protect confidential data.

Specific hardware and software being used to provide a safe and secure computing environment include the following.
  • A dual Cisco Pix Firewall (w/fail over) filters all Internet traffic.
  • iPrism filters all Internet traffic.
  • ePrism filters all email traffic.
  • MacAfee Enterprise provides virus protection for PC and Mac computers (and an additional filter for all email traffic).
  • Active Dirctory provides group poilicies for students and teachers (with elevated privaleges for technology coaches).
  • Active Directoy is also used to manage software installs and updates.

From any location on the network, teachers and students can access their data (in shared network drives). Administrative data, however, are somewhat limited to admin-only areas of the network for security reasons. Currently PSUSD network files are not accessible form home, though it is a possibility that may be exercised over the next three years.


c. List of clear benchmarks and a timeline for obtaining the hardware, infrastructure, learning resources and technical support required to support the other plan components.

5c.1. Software: The District will provide the software and Electronic Learning Resources (ELRs) necessary to support curriculum goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 through 4b.9.

5c.1.1 Objective 1: The District will provide the software and Electronic Learning Resources (ELRs) necessary to support curriculum goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 through 4b.9, as measured by the annual TIS audit and purchasing requests.
  • Baseline: See list of existing software ELRs above.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for new software, recurring subscriptions, and upgrades/maintenance are filled as necessary and as funding allows.
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for new software, recurring subscriptions, and upgrades/maintenance are filled as funding allows.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for new software, recurring subscriptions, and upgrades/maintenance are filled as funding allows.

5c.1.2. Objective 2: All technology related purchases will be sent to the TIS department for review and approval through the Galaxy purchasing software. (In addition, the TIS department will be consulted as early as possible during the purchasing process.)
  • Baseline: Technology related purchases are often sent to the TIS department for review and approval, but on an informal basis. (TIS is sometimes consulted late in the purchasing process or after a purchase is made.)
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: All technology related purchases will be sent to the TIS department for review and approval through the Galaxy purchasing software. (The TIS department will be consulted as early as possible during the purchasing process.)
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: All technology related purchases will be sent to the TIS department for review and approval through the Galaxy purchasing software. (The TIS department will be consulted as early as possible during the purchasing process.)
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: All technology related purchases will be sent to the TIS department for review and approval through the Galaxy purchasing software. (The TIS department will be consulted as early as possible during the purchasing process.)

5c.1.3. Objective 3: The Advisory Committee will establish and maintain a standardized list of approved software and ELRs to guide purchasing and technical support decisions.
  • Baseline: No standardized ist of approved software and ELRs exists.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: The Advisory Committee will create a process for establishing and maintaining a standardized list of approved software and ELRs to guide purchasing and technical support decisions. This will include identification and evaluation of existing software and ELRs that serve the same purpose. The committee will use CLRN as a guiding resource in this process. (Note: A subcommittee can be formed for this purpose.)
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: The Advisory Committee will establish a standardized list of approved software and ELRs to guide purchasing and technical support decisions.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: The Advisory Committee will maintain a standardized list of approved software and ELRs to guide purchasing and technical support decisions.

Note: The annual IT aduit process will appear as an appendix, including the software auditing process.


5c.2. Hardware: The District will provide the hardware (computers and peripherals) necessary to support curriculum goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 through 4b.9.

5c.2.1 Objective 1: The District will provide the hardware (computers and peripherals) necessary to support curriculum goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 through 4b.9, as measured by the annual TIS audit.
  • Baseline: See existing State Technology Survey results and existing TIS audit spreadsheets and images.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for new hardware, computers, and peripherals are filled as necessary and as funding allows.
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for new hardware, computers, and peripherals are filled as necessary and as funding allows.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for new hardware, computers, and peripherals are filled as necessary and as funding allows.

5c.2.2. Objective 2: The District will provide all students (including those in ELL, GATE, and Special Education) with appropriate access to technology, as measured by the District student to computer ratio.
  • Baseline: District Student-to-Computer Ratio (Internet Connected Computers) = 7.01:1 as of 2006 School Technology Survey.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: 7:1
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: 6:1
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: 5:1 (Note: Approximately 1hr/day for each student.)

5c.2.3. Objective 3: All technology related purchases will be sent to the TIS department for review and approval through the Galaxy purchasing software. (In addition, the TIS department will be consulted as early as possible during the purchasing process.)
  • Baseline: Technology related purchases are often sent to the TIS department for review and approval, but on an informal basis.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: All technology related purchases will be sent to the TIS department for review and approval through the Galaxy purchasing software.
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: All technology related purchases will be sent to the TIS department for review and approval through the Galaxy purchasing software.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: All technology related purchases will be sent to the TIS department for review and approval through the Galaxy purchasing software.

5c.2.4. Objective 4: The Advisory Committee will establish and maintain a standardized list of approved hardware (computers and peripherals) and minimum specifications to guide purchasing decisions.
  • Baseline: Minimum specifications have been established (see below).
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: The Advisory Committee will create a process for establishing and maintaining a standardized list of approved hardware (computers and peripherals) and minimum specifications to guide purchasing decisions. (Note: A subcommittee can be formed for this purpose.)
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: The Advisory Committee will establish a standardized list of approved hardware (computers and peripherals) and minimum specifications to guide purchasing decisions.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: The Advisory Committee will maintain a standardized list of approved hardware (computers and peripherals) and minimum specifications to guide purchasing decisions.

5c.2.5. Objective 5: The District will implement one-to-one pilot programs in order to better understand an environment in which each student will have access to a computer whenever necessary to meet the goals in sections 3d and 3e.
  • Baseline: The District has no one-to-one intiative.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: The District will implement a three one-to-one pilot programs: one elementary classroom, one middle school classroom, and one high school classroom. Each program will be hosted in one of the three different geographical hubs of the district. (A total of three pilot teachers)
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: The District will expand the one-to-one pilot programs to include a total of nine programs: one elementary program, one middle school program, and one high school program (freshmen) in each of three hubs. The three existing pilot programs will expand to include a second teacher. An effort will be made to keep students who participated during the previous year in the program for another year. (A total of 12 pilot teachers)
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: The District will expand the one-to-one pilot programs to include one pilot program at each site. All existing pilot programs will expand to include an additional teacher. An effort will be made to keep students who participated during the previous year in the program for another year. (A total of 48 pilot teachers, given the 24 existing sites.) Note: Alternatively, the benchmarks for objective 6 can be aligned with opportunities to open new schools. Note: Perhaps AVID is a natural program for implementing at the high school level. GATE may be a natural for K-8.)

Note: The annual IT audit process will appear as an appendix, including the hardware auditing process.

Note: The minimum specifications will appear in an appendix.


5c.3. Infrastructure: The District will provide the networking and telecommunications infrastructure necessary to support curriculum goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 through 4b.9.

5c.1.1 Objective 1: The District will provide the networking and telecommunications infrastructure necessary to support curriculum goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 through 4b.9, as measured by the annual TIS audit.
  • Baseline: See Will.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for networking and telecommunications infrastructure are filled as necessary and as funding allows.
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for networking and telecommunications infrastructure are filled as necessary and as funding allows.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for networking and telecommunications infrastructure are filled as necessary and as funding allows.

5c.3.2 Objective - The District will increase bandwidth capacity in order to support curriculum goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 through 4b.9.
  • Baseline: Upgrades are underway that will provide all sites with a minimum 200 meg link to a hub site. Each hub has a minimum dual 200 meg link to the district office. The District has a 45 meg link to the RCOE.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: All sites will have a minimum 200 meg link to a hub site. Each hub will have a minimum dual 200 meg links to the district office. The District will have 45 meg link to the RCOE.
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: All sites will have a minimum 200 meg link to a hub site. Each hub will have a dual 200 meg link to the district office. Some hubs will have a dual 1 gig link to the district office. The District will have 45 meg link to the RCOE.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: All sites will have a minimum 200 meg link to a hub site. Each hub will have a dual 1 gig link to the district office. The District will have 45 meg link to the RCOE.

5c.3.3 Objective - The District will provide wireless connectivity at all sites, with additional capacity in 1:1 pilot classrooms.
  • Baseline: All Middle Schools have wireless connectivity in all instructional areas due to the EETT grant.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: All high schools and all middle schools will have wireless connectivity in all instructional areas and 100% of Pilot Sites (3 sites with 3 classrooms total) will have a10:1 laptop-to-accesspoint ratio in all 1:1 pilot classrooms.
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: All schools will have wireless connectivity in all instructional areas and 100% of Pilot Sites (9 sites with 12 classrooms total) will have a 10:1 laptop-to-accesspoint ratio in all 1:1 pilot classrooms.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: All schools will have wireless connectivity in all instructional areas and 10:1 laptop-to-accesspoint ratio in all 1:1 pilot classrooms (48 classrooms).

Note: The annual IT aduit process will appear as an appendix, including spreadsheets summaries and sample images of all IDF and MDF closets.

Note: All new switches will be layer three switches, standardized on Cisco, including wireless access points.


5c.4. Physical Plant: The District will provide the physical plant modifications necessary to support curriculum goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 through 4b.9.

5c.1.1 Objective 1: The District will provide the physical plant modifications necessary to support curriculum goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 through 4b.9, as measured by the annual TIS audit.
  • Baseline: The physical plant meets the current needs at each site. (Discrepencies sometimes occur when teachers want to significantly rearrange a classroom layout.)
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for physical plant modifications are filled as necessary and as funding allows (including interactive white boards, overhead data projectors, and other classroom modifications as requested).
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for physical plant modifications are filled as necessary and as funding allows (including interactive white boards, overhead data projectors, and other classroom modifications as requested).
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for physical plant modifications are filled as necessary and as funding allows (including interactive white boards, overhead data projectors, and other classroom modifications as requested).

Note: The current classroom and site cabling specs will appear as an appendix.


5c.5. Technical Support: The District will provide the technical support necessary to support curriculum goals 3d.1 through 3h.1 and professional development goals 4b.1 through 4b.9.

5c.9.1. Objective - The district will provide staffing for the Technology and Information Systems (TIS) department neccessary to support goals 5a.1 through 5a.8, as measured by the computer to technician ratio.
  • Baseline: Approximately 1000:1
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: 750:1
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: 500:1
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: 350:1 (Note: Extra support needed for 1:1 pilot sites)

5c.9.2. Objective - The district will provide professional development for TIS Staff neccessary to support goals 5a.1 through 5a.8, as measured by the computer to technician ratio, as measured by attendance records and training certifications.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: Professional development will be provided as needed. In addition, TIS staff will be certified as necessary to support the 1:1 pilot program and necessary infrastructure, including help desk support.
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: Professional development will be provided as needed. In addition, TIS staff will be certified as necessary to support the 1:1 pilot program and necessary infrastructure, including help desk support.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: Professional development will be provided as needed. In addition, TIS staff will be certified as necessary to support the 1:1 pilot program and necessary infrastructure, including help desk support.




5c.6. Security: The District will provide a safe and secure computing environment for students and staff.

5c.6.1 Objective 1: The District will provide a safe and secure computing environment for students and staff, to be measured by help desk records and the annual TIS audit.
  • Baseline: See description above.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for safe and secure computing are filled as necessary and as funding allows.
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for safe and secure computing are filled as necessary and as funding allows.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: The annual TIS audit and purchasing requests for safe and secure computing are filled as necessary and as funding allows.

5c.6.2 Objective 2: The District will provide Internet filtering for home use of 1:1 pilot program computers, if necessary. (For example, the District might provide a proxy server for laptops to access the internet.)
  • Baseline: There is currently no Internet filtering provided for home use of computers.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: The Advisory Committee and TIS department will study the issues related to Internet filtering for home use of 1:1 computers and make a recommendation of policies and procedures for board approval.
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: If the board deems it necessary, the District will pilot policies and procedures for providing Internet filtering for home use of 1:1 computers. Policies and procedures will be evaluated and modified as needed.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: If the board deems it necessary, the District will implement the modified policies and procedures for providing Internet filtering for home use of 1:1 computers.


5c.7. Policies and Procedures: The District will establish policies and procedures for student and staff use of the Internet, including email, Instant Messaging, video conferencing, and two-way web technologies such as blogs, wikis, and podcasts.

5c.7.1. Objective 1: The District will establish policies and procedures for student and staff use of the Internet, including email, Instant Messaging, video conferencing, and two-way web technologies such as blogs, wikis, and podcasts.
  • Baseline: See existing AUP. Currently student email is not allowed (except for using Gaggle). There is currently no policy for Instant Messaging, video conferencing, and two-way web technologies such as blogs, wikis, and podcasts.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: The Advisory Committee will study the issues of student and staff use of the Internet (including email, Instant Messaging, video conferencing, and two-way web technologies such as blogs, wikis, and podcasts) and make a recommendation of policies and procedures for board approval. (Note: A subcommittee can be formed for this purpose.)
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: The district will pilot policies and procedures for student and staff use of the Internet, including email, Instant Messaging, video conferencing, and two-way web technologies such as blogs, wikis, and podcasts. Policies and procedures will be evaluated and modified as needed.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: The District will implement the modified policies and procedures for student and staff use of the Internet, including email, Instant Messaging, video conferencing, and two-way web technologies such as blogs, wikis, and podcasts.


5c.7.2 Objective: The District will provide or allow student use of email in order to support curriculum goals 3d.1 through 3h.1.
  • Baseline: Only Gaggle is permitted for student use. Otherwise, no email access permitted. The use of Gaggle requires labor intensive teacher moderation.
  • Benchmark 2007-2008: The Advisory Committee and TIS staff will explore options for providing or allowing student email accounts that do not require labor intensive teacher moderation.
  • Benchmark 2008-2009: The District will pilot options for providing or allowing student email accounts that do not require labor intensive teacher moderation.
  • Benchmark 2009-2010: The District will provide or allow student email accounts that do not require labor intensive teacher moderation.


d. Description of the process that will be used to monitor whether the goals and benchmarks are being reached within the specified time frame.

This section of the plan will be monitored and evaluated by The District Educational Technology Advisory Committee. See sections 3i & j for additional detail about the advisory committee.) The Advisory Committee will meet quarterly to coordinate technology use between programs, to focus on technology needs, and to integrate the implementation of the above goals into existing programs. The advisory committee will support the monitoring and evaluation of this section of the plan by...
  • monitoring and evaluating help desk records, purchasing requests, and the annual TIS audit.
  • monitoring and evaluating District survey results to measure progress on benchmarks district-wide.
  • monitoring and evaluating state technology survey results as necessary.
  • acting on their analysis of the above evaluations to improve implementation of the tech plan goals as needed.
  • annually reviewing progress on technology plan benchmarks, evaluating the effectiveness of the technology plan, and revising the technology plan as needed.

An Infrastructure Subcommittee will be formed to focus on issues relevant to this section of the plan, and to provide support and guidance in these matters for the Advisory Committee as a whole.